Desserts

Earthquake Cake

Prepare to feel the earth moved with this luscious Earthquake Cake recipe! Why is it called Earthquake Cake? It’s because all the ingredients shift and move around in the baking process leaving you with pockets and cracks of sweetness!

It may not be the most eye-catching dessert, but it sure is delicious. It’s super rich so one piece may be more than enough to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Earthquake Cake - Feel the earth move with this luscious dessert! It may not be the prettiest dessert, but it sure tastes delicious.

Earthquake Cake

Expect pockets of gooey sweetness along with a variety of different textures. This dessert is sure to become a family favourite. Plus, it’s pretty straightforward to make.

Serve with a glass of milk or a mug of your favourite tea for a quick afternoon indulgence.

Have you tried Earthquake Cake before?

Earthquake Cake - Feel the earth move with this luscious dessert! It may not be the prettiest dessert, but it sure tastes delicious.

Yield: 10 to 12

Earthquake Cake

Feel the earth move with this luscious dessert! It may not be the prettiest dessert, but it sure tastes delicious.

Ingredients:

  • 1 250g package cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 3 cups icing sugar (powdered sugar)
  • 1 cup pecans, chopped
  • 1 cup shredded sweetened coconut
  • 1 box chocolate cake mix
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Grease a 9×13 baking pan and set aside.
  2. Beat cream cheese, butter and icing sugar together until smooth. Set aside.
  3. Spread pecans and coconut on the bottom of the baking pan.
  4. In a large bowl, stir together cake mix, water, eggs, oil and sweetened condensed milk. Pour into baking pan.
  5. Spoon cream cheese mixture over cake.
  6. Bake for 40 minutes.



Stacie Vaughan

Stacie is the mom of two girls and lives in Ontario, Canada. She enjoys cooking/baking, photography, reading, DIY and is fueled by lots of coffee!

more by Stacie »