Product Reviews

Cahootie Review

I was so excited to review the Cahootie. It brought back many memories of third and fourth grade recess and lunch time adventures. My daughter was just as thrilled with it, as I was to remember playing the game. We had kind of a hectic week last week and my girls were not getting along. I told them that I had a surprise for them if they could just get along for a few minutes. The Cahootie brought me over an hour of giggling girls!

The Cahootie is made of durable paper. It’s a little bit like cardstock but glossy. There are 40 reusable stickers that say things like You’ll start your own totally glam clothing company and You’ll be groovin n a movin in a music video soon. Jahnna loved that she got to choose the prompts for the inside of the Cahootie. She read each of them out loud to her sister and they carefully peeled the stickers off and placed them inside.

Riley is only three so she was kind of clueless as to the meanings but she loved being able to pick a picture and have her sister spell it out for her. Once you get the stickers placed you can play the game. It took about ten minutes to put it together but that was only because Jahnna was very selective in which stickers she wanted.

Cahootie has several themes available to choose from. There is the one we received called Wishes & Dreams. There are Girl Wonders, Fab Friends, Truth or Dare, Birthday Wishes and there is even a Democrat and Republican one. If you are throwing a party there is a party pack with 6 different Cahootie’s in it. This would provide a lot of entertainment for a slumber party!

You can find Cahootie’s on Amazon or in select Hallmark and Learning Select stores. To find the store nearest you, you can also visit their website Cahootie.com

*I was not financially compensated for this post. I received a sample of the product for review purposes. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.*

Erin

Erin is an Army wife and mom of two girls and one boy who lives in Utah. I love to read, blog, and be an advocate for childhood stroke survivors like her son.

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